Warm nights may impact corn yields

Warm nights may impact corn yields

Higher temperatures can result in wasteful respiration and low yields.

Weathercasters are calling for continued above average temperatures in August, especially higher night time temperatures.

Past studies show that night time temperatures affect yield potential.

High night temperatures (in the 70s or 80s degrees F) can result in wasteful respiration and a lower net amount of dry matter accumulation in plants. The rate of respiration of plants increases rapidly as the temperature increases, approximately doubling for each 13 degree F increase.

With high night temperatures more of the sugars produced by photosynthesis during the day are lost; less is available to fill developing kernels, thereby lowering potential grain yield.

High night time temperatures result in faster heat unit (GDD) accumulation that can lead to earlier corn maturation, whereas cool night temperatures result in slower GDD accumulation that can lengthen grain filling and promote greater dry matter accumulation and grain yields.

Research at the University of Illinois conducted back in the 1960’s indicated that corn grown at night temperatures in the mid-60s (degrees F) out yielded corn grown at temperatures in the mid-80s (degrees F).

Average corn yields are generally much higher with irrigation in western states, which have low humidity and limited rainfall. While these areas are characterized by hot sunny days, night temperatures are often cooler than in the Eastern Corn Belt. 

Low night temperatures during grain fill (which typically occurs in July and August) have been associated with some of our highest corn yields in Ohio. The cool night temperatures may have reduced respiration losses during grain fill and lengthened the rain fill period.

Cooler than average night temperatures can also mitigate water stress and slow the development of foliar diseases and insect problems.

Originally posted by Ohio State University. 

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