Corn+Soybean Digest
Tim Couserrsquos combine cab is filled with monitors from his iPad on the upper left to his 2020 Seed Sense yield sense his GS3 Guidance monitor a Hillco Single Pass Round Baler SPRB control monitor a combinefunctions monitor and in the lower right a backend visual view of the lower right hitch of the combine Couser and father Bill feed their field data into the iPad using Google Drive to share any new information instantly The Hillco SPRB monitors status of the corncobresidue bales formed onthego behind t

Tim Couser’s combine cab is filled with monitors, from his iPad on the upper left to his 20-20 Seed Sense yield sense; his GS3 Guidance monitor; a Hillco Single Pass Round Baler (SPRB) control monitor; a combine-functions monitor; and in the lower right, a back-end visual view of the lower right hitch of the combine. Couser and father Bill feed their field data into the iPad, using Google Drive to share any new information instantly. The Hillco SPRB monitors status of the corncob/residue bales formed on-the-go behind the combine. The lower-right hitch monitor allows a rear view that helps monitor the baler hopper and line up the baler hitch to the combine.

Merge art, science to farm for the big picture

Think different Tim Couser, Nevada, Iowa, figures he can lower costs, increase yields and/or market better. His profit plan includes the following: Improved operational efficiency to lower costs. Examples include finding ways to do multiple operations in one trip such as sidedress with the sprayer, apply cover crops with a modified disk ripper and a new concept: using a single-pass round baler. Increased yields by implementing proven practices in earlier replicated strip trials. Couser has done a great deal of these despite the extreme weather. Several in-furrow biological treatments, novel seed treatments, many hybrid/variety trials and many spreadsheets have handed him higher yields (see list). Narrow corn and bean rows, on-farm trials, and future banding of liquid nutrients. Enthusiasm for learning and big-picture thinking to help solve sticky challenges.

Farming is not getting any easier; the low-hanging fruit has been picked. How do young producers achieve success with falling prices?

“That’s what makes farming so much fun,” says Tim Couser, a Nevada, Iowa, farmer. “It’s half science and half art. Being a low cost producer takes a lot of work; the next yield breakthrough will definitely be harder to achieve.”

On his central Iowa corn, soybean and seed f

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