Corn+Soybean Digest
USDA Crop Progress, June 15, 2015

USDA Crop Progress, June 15, 2015

Nearly all of the planted corn has emerged, and conditions are still holding steady. Soybean planting is moving along, but has fallen behind average pace, along with emergence rates. Crop condition fell just slightly in the last week.

Corn

Ninety-seven percent of the overall corn crop has now emerged, 2 points ahead of average pace. All of the planted corn in Illinois and North Carolina has popped out of the soil, and other states are close, including: Iowa (98%), Minnesota (99%) and Tennessee (98%).

The overall condition of the corn crop is holding steady, losing 2 points in good condition, but gaining 1 point in excellent condition for an overall good/excellent rating of 73%. 84  87 84 The following states have the most corn in good/excellent condition Iowa (84%), Pennsylvania (87%) and Wisconsin (84%).

Soybeans

Soybean planting continues in all major soybean-planting states for an overall completion rate of 87%, 3 points behind average. Minnesota farmers are nearly finished planting with 99% of their soybeans in the ground. Farmers in Michigan, North Dakota and Wisconsin won't be far behind, with 97% of the soybeans planted in each of those states.

The overall soybean emergence rate continues to climb, jumping 11 points in the past week to 75% emerged. This is 2 points behind the five-year average. Most states are seeing around normal emergence rates; some a bit ahead, some a bit behind. However, progress is still really lagging in Kansas (30% emerged compared to 70% average) and Missouri (28% emerged, 65% average).

Overall soybean condition dropped slightly in the good rating, for an overall good/excellent rating this week of 67%. Last year at this time, 73% of the crop was in good/excellent condition. In Iowa, 80% of its soybean crop is in good/excellent condition. Kentucky's soybean crop is rated 81% good/excellent, and North Dakota's crop is 83% good/excellent. Wisconsin has the most beans in goo/excellent condition at 86%.

TAGS: Corn
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